Posts Tagged ‘Planting Dreams book’

Planting Dreams in Kansas Heat

Written by lindahubalek on . Posted in Blog, Planting Dreams book series

Planting Dreams book by Linda K. HubalekToday I’m thinking of those Swedish immigrant’s first summer in Kansas as our heat index is way over 100+ degrees again- like it has been for the whole month.

The women would have been wearing long-sleeved dresses, lots of yards of material, and sweat. Of course they’d be very sunburned if they weren’t covering all their skin….

Living in a handmade hole in the ground or flimsy wooden shack with a dirt floor…with mice, flies, snakes, ticks. No air conditioning. Just hope for a breeze.

Tired sweaty little kids…who hopefully are not sick…

Thirsty? How far do they need to walk to find water…which is probably scooped into a bucket directly out of a river or creek until they got a well dug.

Hungry? Where to find it, catch it, keep it safe to eat without a way to keep it below 40 degrees?

I know generations have grown up without air conditioning (as did I as a child) but it makes me real glad for modern times…and makes me admire the pioneer women that had to suffer through their first summer of Kansas heat. I think it would have been so different compared to a mild Swedish summer they would have been used to.

So you be cool today with climate controlled air, an iced drink, cold food, and hopefully doing an indoor activity.

Think about those first pioneer women and Kansas heat by reading the Planting Dreams series instead!

Planting Dreams: 
A Swedish Immigrant’s Journey to America, 1868-1869

Drought has scorched the farmland of Sweden and there is no harvest to feed families or livestock. Taxes are due and there is little money to pay them.

But there is a ship sailing for America, where the government is giving land to anyone who wants to claim a homestead.

So begins the migration out of Sweden to a new life on the Great Plains of America.

Can you imagine what life would have been like once they got to their new destination?

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Ebook Sale on Planting Dreams Series

Written by lindahubalek on . Posted in Blog

In honor of Father’s Day, three ebooks will be on sale for $3.99 for a month at only two sites, Amazon and Barnes and Noble. You can either download them for Kindle or Nook. Get them now and enjoy!

Planting Dreams Series- Historical Fiction About Pioneer Families

My third book series is based on my father’s Swedish ancestors who came first to Illinois, and then on to Salemsborg, Kansas in 1869.
Charlotta’s thoughtful writing covers the time period of 1868-1919 and tells why the Swedish immigrants decided to leave, their journey, and their life on the Kansas prairie.

This book series is based on stories and photos from Johnson descendants, along with fiction depicting Kansas history during this time period.
 

Planting Dreams: A Swedish Immigrant’s Journey to America
Book 1, 1868-1869

Planting Dreams book by Linda K. HubalekDrought has scorched the farmland of Sweden and there is no harvest to feed families or livestock. Taxes are due and there is little money to pay them. But there is a ship sailing for America, where the government is giving land to anyone who wants to claim a homestead. Can you imagine starting a journey to an unknown country, no knowing what the country would be like, where you would live, or how you would survive? Did you make the right decision to leave in the first place?

For more information and how to buy the Planting Dreams ebook or book>>>

Cultivating Hope: Homesteading on the Great Plains
Book 2, 1869-1886

Cultivating Hope book by Kansas author Linda K. Hubalek.Can you imagine being isolated in the middle of a treeless grassland with only a dirt roof over your head? Having to feed your children with whatever wild plants or animals you could find living on the prairie? Sweating to plow the sod, plant the seed, cultivate the crop- only to lose it all by a hailstorm right before you harvest it?

The second book, in the Planting Dreams series portrays Swedish immigrant Charlotta Johnson as she and her husband build a farmstead on the Kansas Prairie.

For more information and how to buy the Cultivating Hope ebook or book>>>

Harvesting Faith: Life on the Changing Prairie
Book 3, 1886-1919

Harvesting Faith book by Linda K. Hubalek.Imagine surveying your farmstead on the last day of your life, reviewing the decades of joys, hardships, and changes that have taken place on the eighty acres you have called home for the past fifty years. Would you feel at peace or find remorse at the decisions that took place in your life?
This third book in the Planting Dreams book series portrays Charlotta Johnson as she recalls the events that shaped her family’s destiny.

For more information and how to buy the Trail of Thread ebook or book>>>

Charlotta's Home

Written by lindahubalek on . Posted in Blog

Ancestors of Linda K. Hubalek, author of the Planting Dreams series.Sunday I toured the house that Charlotta’s sister’s family built so I thought I’d show you Charlotta and Samuel’s house on their farm.

Cultivating Hope, the second book, in the Planting Dreams series portrays Swedish immigrant Charlotta Johnson as she and her husband build a farmstead on the Kansas Prairie.

This family faced countless challenges as they homesteaded on America’s Great Plains during the 1800s. Years of hard work develop the land and improve the quality of life for her family—but not without a price.

Personally, looking for photos and then finding clues in them is always the best part of research book series. The photo of Samuel and Charlotta’s family shows a new house, winter time, and missing two children of the family. Hmmm…

My grandparents had a very old album that had photos of two children in caskets.  Researching the cemetery stones and church records, the children, Theodore and Almeda, died January 18 and 19, 1884—twelve days after Charlotta gave birth to son Joseph.

So, I’m guessing the photographer was out to take pictures of the deceased children, and then also took the photo of the family in the front of the house. The baby is not in Charlotta’s arms, so he must have been left inside since it was cold.

Have I drawn you into the story yet? If you’re curious, buy the ebook series now…

Mathilda's Family Photo

Written by lindahubalek on . Posted in Blog

Yesterday I mentioned that my great-great grandparents Samuel and Charlotta Johnson would have visited the Jaderborg house since her sister lived there.

The Johnsons left Sweden with two young children in 1868 and first settled in Illinois. Mathilda and a friend traveled to America the next spring and met up with Charlotta.

Mathilda stayed and worked in Chicago while my ancestors moved on with a group of Swedes to Kansas to claim land under the Homestead Act.

Eventually Mathilda moved to Kansas and married Lars Jaderborg. I thought you’d enjoy seeing a photo of their family.

I’ll keep blogging bits of the stories and pictures from the Planting Dreams series, so if you want to follow along, please just sign up at www.LindaHubalek.com/feed/rss.

Planting Dreams

Written by lindahubalek on . Posted in Blog

I’m a very vivid dreamer. And the colors, smells, feelings are so real that I can feel like I’m still in the scene hours after I wake up.

How the brain pulls up old memories and mixes it with current information is beyond my comprehension. The other morning I was back in a certain pasture ready to open the gate for the buffalo herd that was galloping over the terrain.

Worst dreams are family and friends in dire need of help in a current crisis. (I don’t watch 10 o’clock news for that very reason.) And I can still remember dreams from decades ago.

I’m also very good at daydreaming—especially when I should be doing something else—but that’s usually when I come up with my most creative ideas.

Planting Dreams book by Linda K. HubalekMy Planting Dreams book series is about Samuel and Charlotta Johnson, my Swedish ancestors that dreamed of a better life for their family. Being young then they traveling to America, I’m sure they didn’t realize what they were getting into.

But I’m sure their parents had both cons, and pros for their children’s dreams of America. They would have remembered dreams and wishes of their past, both lived and unfulfilled. And that’s just the way life is, both in the past and for us now.

I’ll see what I “dream up” today, both day and night— but I bet after thinking about family stories from the past— I’ll be seeing them tonight in my dreams.