Posts Tagged ‘Kansas Quilter book series’

20 years & Kindle Unlimited

Written by lindahubalek on . Posted in Blog, western romance

Dear Readers,

Thanks so much for your continual support of my writing. It’s been twenty years since I started Butterfield Books Inc., and I appreciate your support over two decades!

I have two series in the works right now that I want to tell you about.

Tying the Knot, the first book in the Kansas Quilter Series is already available, and there will be two more books in it. It’s about my great grandmother and her quilts.

Greta: Brides with Grit by Linda K. HubalekI’m also working on a new western romance series, tentatively titled Brides with Grit. This series features fictional characters ranching near cowtown Ellsworth, Kansas in 1873, and I’m having a blast writing the first book about Greta and Jacob. I’ll tell you more about the characters next month.

Here’s a photo taken from my great-grandparents album that I’m using as “Greta”. Of course there’s no name on the back of the actual photo…so I picked this one because both Greta (and her twin Gussie in book 3) have blonde braids.

Hopefully, these tidbits will keep you interested until my next books are available for you to enjoy!

Kindle Unlimited

The big news in the publishing industry is that Amazon recently started a ebook subscription called Kindle Unlimited– and I decided to be part of it. All Butterfield Books Inc. are in this program now. How does it work? The reader buys a monthly subscription for $9.99 (first month is free) then you can download ten books at a time, and enjoy reading.

The only catch for us authors is that the reader needs to read (or go through) 10% of the book for us to get paid, so please be sure to do that. We’ll all appreciate it!

Thanks! Linda Hubalek

Planning a 90th Birthday Party

Written by lindahubalek on . Posted in Blog, Kansas Quilter book series

Cake stand-1949Even though my mom has a computer, she’s not savvy on it, so I think I’m safe to say me and my siblings are working on a picture book to celebrate her 90th birthday this month.

But don’t tell her because it’s a surprise…although dad got a book for his 90th birthday last year so I’m sure she’s expecting it…but doesn’t know the theme yet.

When going through old photos to put in this book, one thing that kept popping up was birthday photos. “Us kids” are standing by a frosted cake, usually on a particular glass cake stand. There are candles on each cake, and I’ve gotten my magnifying glass out to count them if there wasn’t a date on the photo. (Pictured here is my brother’s first birthday cake in 1949.)

There’s enough “cake” photos that it became the theme for the book—not only birthdays, but for anniversaries, graduations, weddings, and Mother’s and Father’s Day.

We all have our favorite kind of cake, so it will be an angel food cake on the cake stand when we celebrate mom’s birthday next week.

70th wedding anniversaryIt was also interesting that I found photos of my great grandparent’s Ira and Kizzie, celebrating their special days with a cake too—including their 70th wedding anniversary in 1964.

My Kansas Quilter series is about this special lady. The first book Tying the Knot is done and now I’m working on the next book Patching Home. Maybe I’ll work a birthday cake scene in this book since I’m putting together a 90th birthday party now…

Contests to win new book, Tying the Knot

Written by lindahubalek on . Posted in Blog, Kansas Quilter book series

Author Linda Hubalek and great grandmother

Kizzie Pieratt & Linda Hubalek, 1959

Enter contests for my new book Tying the Knot

Please enjoy my new book, post a review online somewhere, and tell your friends and family about it. I appreciate it!

AND, there are three places you can win free books.  I’m giving away three print copies of Tying the Knot at a Goodreads contest. If you want to win one of five ebook copies, either go on my author website or Facebook contest.

Who is in this photo with this blog? It’s me at age five with my great grandmother Kizzie, who was age 85 at the time, taken back in 1959. It’s hard to believe the influence she had on me at a young age, but I must have been impressed with her stories even back then.

Enjoy my new book from the Kansas prairie!

Tying the Knot is done!

Written by lindahubalek on . Posted in Blog, Kansas Quilter book series

Tying the Knot by Linda K. HubalekI wrote in my diary on April 24, 1982 that I wanted to write a book about my great grandmother Kizzie Pieratt and the many quilts she made. Although that idea started my writing career, I didn’t get around to starting on Kizzie’s book until 2003. Then other things in life took priority…

Now I’m proud to say the first book in my great grandmother’s story Tying the Knot is finally out this week! The Kansas Quilter series starts with my ancestor’s decision to leave their rented Kansas farm to move to the Indian Territory in 1902 (before Oklahoma became a state). Although the story line is fiction, I worked in facts and family photos as Kizzie prepares for their wagon trip. Some of the many quilts Kizzie made are woven into the story and I have photos of them in the book too.

I wonder what Kizzie would have thought of her quilts being featured in a book. Like most women, she probably be proud of some of her quilts, and wished I had left others out! But all these quilts are special to me, first when they kept me warm on winter nights as a child, and now as I write about them 50 years later.

If you’ve read my Trail of Thread series, this new series continues with Kizzie Pieratt, who would have been Maggie Kennedy Pieratt’s daughter-in-law. Maggie was featured in Stitch of Courage, and this is her grown childrens’ story.

 

A Cat and Three Quilts

Written by lindahubalek on . Posted in Blog, quilts and quilting

Linda Hubalek's cat

Linda Hubalek’s cat

Lilac Lane Patterns had me as a guest blogger today about my quilts. (Here’s the story below, but go to their website to see all the photos of the quilts I talk about.)

What’s on my bed? Gray Cat, my 10 year old male cat that sleeps on my bed most of the day.
Oh, but what’s UNDER Gray Cat? A washable comforter…
What would I like to have on my bed besides gray cat hair? My antique quilts that my ancestors made—and I have twenty-seven to choose from…
And each quilt makes the bed, and room, look totally different.

Today I’ll show you some of my great grandmother, Kizzie Pieratt’s quilts, and next Friday I’ll show you some of my grandmother, Irene Pieratt Akers’ quilts.

Kizzie raised eight children, was the main farmer in the family, and quilted other people’s quilt tops for additional income. Most of the quilts I have of hers were made to be functional, and used on our own family’s beds when I was growing up in the 1950s.

She made enough quilt blocks for more than one quilt at a time, and then used different material for between the blocks and the backing. For example I have two Pinwheel quilts, one with a blue backing, and the other with a pink one.
Most often the heavy quilts were tied, like this wool tied Fan design, instead of quilted.
But, I have a few wonderful quilts that she stitched tens of thousands of stitches in that material too.
The bright yellow Log Cabin Star quilt was made from feed sacks. That was a lot of chicken feed to get that many sacks of yellow material.
It’s fun to reminisce about these quilts and the woman that made them. In fact, I’m working on a book about Kizzie and her quilts now titled The Kansas Quilter.
To learn more about this book, and my ten other books about pioneer women that homesteaded on the Kansas prairie, please visit my website at http://LindaHubalek.com.

And please check back to this blog site next week to see even more antique quilts on my bed.

Robert Pieratt- Civil War Soldier

Written by lindahubalek on . Posted in about Trail of Thread book series, Blog

Robert Pieratt, Civil War soldier, 1862.

Robert Pieratt, Civil War soldier, 1862.

Today I’m going through old photos that I’ll include in my next book. These are pictures I took in 2002 with my camera, of old portraits that were in my great uncle’s chest of family history.  Now—eleven years later— I’m scanning, cropping and figuring out where to put in my book, The Kansas Quilter.

As I sort them by family, and study the photos with a magnifying glass, I’m finding clues to my ancestors’ pasts.

For example here’s a photo of Robert Pieratt, probably taken when he enlisted in 1862. He died on Feb. 19, 1863—at the age of 17.

Here’s how I wrote his death in the letter, Feb. 26, 1863 in Stitch of Courage.

“Robert died at Fort Scott on February 19. He had the measles, then succumbed to pneumonia. We barely knew he was sick until Mr. Pieratt got word that he was dead and buried. I curse this war! If it hadn’t been for the Secession, Robert would have been home, alive and well. I can’t stand to think what conditions Robert lived in and must have died in without his family around him in his last hours. In my mind I picture him lying in a spindly cot without enough blankets, no one to bathe his fevered brow, all alone. Did he still have my quilt with him? Did he lose it, or wasn’t it thick enough to keep him warm and safe? Questions keep haunting me, along with his friendly face. I saw it only two months ago!”

(Excerpt from Stitch of Courage © Linda K. Hubalek)

Now look at the photo again and think how bittersweet it would be to have a picture of your son as he’s ready to go to war, and then to hear you’ll never see him again.

And then there’s more in this letter in Stitch of Courage, and you realize…

“The word of Robert’s passing came after his stepmother, Nancy, died of bronchitis on the 20th. She hadn’t been well for the last month but turned worse quickly at the end. The Pieratt children have lost two mothers. I feel their pain as I relive my own loss. Life can be so hard on children. “

The father, John Pieratt (from Trail of Thread) lost a son on the 19th and his wife on the 20th.

These are the emotions I try to portray for my books, because they were real—especially when you find an old photo like this one and know the story behind it…

Welcoming the New Year

Written by lindahubalek on . Posted in Blog, Kansas Quilter book series

Author Linda Hubalek's great grandmother Kizzie Pieratt

Linda Hubalek’s great grandmother Kizzie Pieratt

The year 2012 went by fast for me as my husband and I built our own house, plus me taking care of my aging parents. Both “jobs” were filled with work, trauma, and joy. But, these were important things that I wouldn’t have wanted to miss.

Now I’m starting the new year by moving into my new home office and planning my dad’s 90th birthday open house on Jan. 20th.

I’m enjoying a sunny winter snow scene from my office window and getting back in gear…and still wondering what I did with… where I put… certain files… that envelope of research photos, etc.

I wasn’t able to concentrate on my writing as I would have liked to last year, but now I’m working on my next book.

I have enough research done to start writing the story of my great grandmother, Kizzie Pieratt who was a spunky pioneer, and an avid quilter.

It’s going to be fun to write her story. Please keep tuned in to see how the new book progresses.

Kansas Quilter died 40 Years ago

Written by lindahubalek on . Posted in about Trail of Thread book series, Blog, Kansas Quilter book series

Wedding photo for Ira and Kizzie Pieratt

Ira and Kizzie Pieratt

I thought of my great grandmother Kizzie Pieratt several times yesterday. It had been 40 years since she died. Besides my having a good memory for event dates, I’ve been working on the Kansas Quilter book series about her life and the quilts she made. I watched the calendar as her death date approached.

She and husband Ira were married 70 years, and she lived another seven years after he died. My husband and I have been married 35 years this month­—half the amount that my great grandparents were married.

Kizzie and Ira were pioneer children. First generation to be born to my Kansas homesteading ancestors featured in my Trail of Thread book series.

I think of all the changes I’ve seen in my life span, and then compare it to theirs. Huge inventions—electricity, telephones, cars, and airplanes, and so much more—were invented during their lifetime.

Although Kizzie’s been gone for several decades, I still have items we both touched and used…including her quilts she hand stitched decades ago.

Electricity may have changed how we can make quilts, but quilting is still done the same way—with our hands, while thinking of who may touch the quilt in future generations.

Books, Books the Magical Fruit Interview about Linda Hubalek

Written by lindahubalek on . Posted in about Trail of Thread book series, Blog, Butter in the Well book series

I enjoy book bloggers  interview questions, because they really come up with some good ones. Here’s some of my answers from a recent blog site called “Books, Books the Magical Fruit.” The blogger read and reviewed the book Trail of Thread too.

(Want to review or blog about my books for your blog? Please send me an email!)
Pioneer Writer, Linda K. Hubalek

Describe your book in five words or less.

Endearing Kansas pioneer women stories.

How did the ideas for your books come to you?

I started writing books in 1992 when my husband was transferred to California for a two-year engineering project. I was homesick for the Midwest and started writing about the Swedish immigrant woman that homesteaded our family farm.

What is the hardest part of writing for you? What’s the easiest?

Hardest part? Getting started and staying focused. Easiest? I love the research and reading about that time period that my books are set in.

What’s next for you? Are you currently working on or have plans for future projects?

Currently I’m working on my fourth book series, the Kansas Quilter, featuring my great grandmother Kizzie (Hamman) Pieratt. Born in 1874, Kizzie grew up in a large family in the Flint Hills of Kansas. She married Ira Pieratt in 1894 and had eight children over a twenty-year span.

The Pieratt family was featured in my Trail of Thread series, so the Kansas Quilter series will continue their original story into the next generation of characters.

Kizzie was known for her quilting. I’m sure at first it was a necessity to keep her brood warm, but she also completed quilts for other people for an income. As I research and write this series I’m taking a closer look at the family quilts that my great grandmother made during her ninety-seven years.

I’ll piece together Kizzie’s stories and photos and post them in my blog and in the finished books. Look for the first book, tentatively titled Tying the Knot in the late fall of 2011.

Why did you choose to write for specific genre?

All my series have been based on real people, places and the events that went on during their lifetime. It’s a good way to get the research and story started, and it has become my chosen genre.

What’s it like hearing that readers are eagerly awaiting your book’s release date?

That’s what keeps me pumped up, knowing that someone out there appreciates the research and time put into writing my books. And it means I’ve touched their hearts with my words, and maybe lead them to understand the lives of their own ancestors too.

What is one question that you’ve always wanted to be asked in an interview? How would you answer that question?

What does your family think of you writing books? Of course my family is proud that I’m a published author, but also proud of the ancestors and farms featured in my series. My parents still live on the original farm portrayed in my first series, Butter in the Well. Because I put township maps in the books (and the roads are still the same) they know when a reader has found their farm. A car slowly drives by to look at the old house and barn featured in the series.

Where can readers find you and your books?

Go through my website, www.LindaHubalek.com to find all the links for ebooks and print books.

Review for Trail of Thread: I have to say this was a wonderful book – Little House for grown-ups. The letters tell the story of leaving for the unknown prairie and what goes on. I found each letter more enticing than the last to see where the journey would take them. I like that there are quilts that help tell the story also. The patterns are part of what goes on and the materials used are always relevant to the purpose of the quilt.

I would definitely like to learn more about what goes on once they arrive. I see this as being a wonderful series of books. Write on!- Reviewer Sue Fitzpatrick

Another Clue

Written by lindahubalek on . Posted in Blog

Pieratt family that author Linda Hubalek is researching for her Kansas Quilter Book seriesHere’s another photo I’m guessing was taken in the Oklahoma Territory when my great aunt Mildred was born in 1904. Pictured with baby Mildred, sitting on her grandfather James Monroe Pieratt’s knee,  and — here again I’m guessing— his adult children, Marion, Ira (my great grandfather), Jimmy, and Martha.

Their mother Maggie, (Margaret Jane Kennedy Pieratt- featured in my Stitch of Courage book) and three other children had all died prior to 1883. James Monroe remarried his widowed sister-in-law, Harriet (wife of brother Belvard) and had two more children, Daisy and Kate, which were present in the last photo I showed you, but not in this photo.

Stitch of Courage, Book 3 in the Trail of Thread book series by Linda K. Hubalek.I’m guessing this photo was taken on same house and porch, but this time there is another clue of a house number 328 showing on the top of the porch. I wonder if this house is still there in Chickasha, OK?

Researching is my favorite part of writing. I never know when a clue might change the course and facts of a book— and my family history.