Posts Tagged ‘antique quilts’

Tying the Knot is done!

Written by lindahubalek on . Posted in Blog, Kansas Quilter book series

Tying the Knot by Linda K. HubalekI wrote in my diary on April 24, 1982 that I wanted to write a book about my great grandmother Kizzie Pieratt and the many quilts she made. Although that idea started my writing career, I didn’t get around to starting on Kizzie’s book until 2003. Then other things in life took priority…

Now I’m proud to say the first book in my great grandmother’s story Tying the Knot is finally out this week! The Kansas Quilter series starts with my ancestor’s decision to leave their rented Kansas farm to move to the Indian Territory in 1902 (before Oklahoma became a state). Although the story line is fiction, I worked in facts and family photos as Kizzie prepares for their wagon trip. Some of the many quilts Kizzie made are woven into the story and I have photos of them in the book too.

I wonder what Kizzie would have thought of her quilts being featured in a book. Like most women, she probably be proud of some of her quilts, and wished I had left others out! But all these quilts are special to me, first when they kept me warm on winter nights as a child, and now as I write about them 50 years later.

If you’ve read my Trail of Thread series, this new series continues with Kizzie Pieratt, who would have been Maggie Kennedy Pieratt’s daughter-in-law. Maggie was featured in Stitch of Courage, and this is her grown childrens’ story.

 

A Cat and Three Quilts

Written by lindahubalek on . Posted in Blog, quilts and quilting

Linda Hubalek's cat

Linda Hubalek’s cat

Lilac Lane Patterns had me as a guest blogger today about my quilts. (Here’s the story below, but go to their website to see all the photos of the quilts I talk about.)

What’s on my bed? Gray Cat, my 10 year old male cat that sleeps on my bed most of the day.
Oh, but what’s UNDER Gray Cat? A washable comforter…
What would I like to have on my bed besides gray cat hair? My antique quilts that my ancestors made—and I have twenty-seven to choose from…
And each quilt makes the bed, and room, look totally different.

Today I’ll show you some of my great grandmother, Kizzie Pieratt’s quilts, and next Friday I’ll show you some of my grandmother, Irene Pieratt Akers’ quilts.

Kizzie raised eight children, was the main farmer in the family, and quilted other people’s quilt tops for additional income. Most of the quilts I have of hers were made to be functional, and used on our own family’s beds when I was growing up in the 1950s.

She made enough quilt blocks for more than one quilt at a time, and then used different material for between the blocks and the backing. For example I have two Pinwheel quilts, one with a blue backing, and the other with a pink one.
Most often the heavy quilts were tied, like this wool tied Fan design, instead of quilted.
But, I have a few wonderful quilts that she stitched tens of thousands of stitches in that material too.
The bright yellow Log Cabin Star quilt was made from feed sacks. That was a lot of chicken feed to get that many sacks of yellow material.
It’s fun to reminisce about these quilts and the woman that made them. In fact, I’m working on a book about Kizzie and her quilts now titled The Kansas Quilter.
To learn more about this book, and my ten other books about pioneer women that homesteaded on the Kansas prairie, please visit my website at http://LindaHubalek.com.

And please check back to this blog site next week to see even more antique quilts on my bed.

Why were these Quilts kept?

Written by lindahubalek on . Posted in about Trail of Thread book series, Blog

Double Wedding Band quilt owned by author Linda HubalekWe had a warm sunny day this week, so I pulled out a tub of quilts I inherited from Lois, my mother-in-law. They had been stored in a cedar chest, made as a high school project by her future husband back in about 1925.

I spread a white tablecloth on the driveway and unfolded the first quilt. The double wedding band quilt is a beautiful display of color, stitching, and handwork. The intricate machine stitching alone had to take days to do. The quilt is a real work of art, in perfect shape, probably rarely used except as a display on the bed for when company came. It could have been a wedding present.

The second quilt I spread out was almost past the “thread bare” stage, faded from years of use and washings. Scraps of fabric, with no color scheme, just made from what was available. I’m sure it dates back to at least my mother-in-law’s days of growing up in the 1920s- 1930s. Researching the pattern, I’d say it is a Double Quartet quilt block pattern featured in Capper’s Weekly in 1927.

Double Quartet Antique Quilt owned by author Linda HubalekThey are both machine stitched, with no signature or date on either quilt.

Lois was a very practical, organized woman, and never seemed attached to mementos from the past. She only kept and used what she needed. So now looking at this old worn out quilt, I wonder who made it, and why did she keep it.

I’m guessing the first quilt was kept because it was a gift, and a treasure due to the workmanship. The second quilt though, even plain and worn out, must have had very special memories attached to it.

My writer’s imagination flashes through many scenarios. Was it on Lois’ bed when growing up or on her sister Helen’s bed who died when the girl was a teenager? Made by a grandmother and used by the grandfather that lived with her family. Or, was it just an old quilt used as a picnic blanket in their first car?

I’ll never know the history of these quilts since the previous owner is now gone. I’m just guessing they were kept for some special reason besides for display and warmth.

Maybe I’ll honor these quilts with new “memories” in one of my future books like I did in the Trail of Thread series …